Feature Service Article

Changing Destinies: How Entrepreneurs Help Build Democracy

Kim Eric Bettcher, Entrepreneurs drive change. They provide ideas, initiative, and leadership that invigorate development and transform society. Young, growing firms lead economic change by propelling gains in productivity and employment. In doing so, they reshape attitudes, social relations, and institutions. They are therefore crucial to building prosperous societies that can deliver opportunity to all. Read more…

Democratic and Market Values Face Obstacles in Poland

Mieczysław Bąk, Anna Szczesniak, and Przemysław Kulawczuk, Introduction The main objective of this report is to analyze the current perception of democracy in Poland, describe challenges facing the development of democracy, and identify actions that can improve the rule of law. The report is based on the recent results of roundtable discussions with thought leaders, focus-group meetings with students, an internet survey, and research conducted by the Institute for Private Enterprise and Democracy (IPED). Read more…

Declaration of Commitment to Liberty and Prosperity in Central and Eastern Europe

As the countries of Central and Eastern Europe embarked on a program of ambitious democratic and market reforms at the end of the 20th century, there was a powerful sense of optimism about building a stronger, more united and freer Europe. But in recent years, doubts have arisen about the region’s performance in the face of ongoing governance challenges, including persistent corruption. It was clear that action needed to be taken. Read more…

The Role of the Private Sector in Improving Public Services in Arab Nations

Dr. Patrick Mardini, Most people in the Arab world believe that the state has a fundamental obligation to supply goods and services that they qualify as consider to be public services, such as health care, education, solid waste treatment, electricity, roads, and other infrastructure. The list also includes goods and services in “strategic industries” such as telecommunications, aviation, military, agriculture, and the extraction of natural resources. Arab citizens tend to view the state as a guardian angel with the primary responsibility of supplying life’s necessities. Read more…

Democratic Backsliding in Bulgaria

Petar Ganev, Political Landscape in Bulgaria Read more…

How Good Governance Got a Bad Name – and Why Governance Still Matters

Kim Bettcher, Since the rise of governance on the development agenda in the 1990s, followed by the proliferation of governance programs, a chorus of skepticism has emerged over the efficacy of governance work.[1] Scholars like Merilee Grindle and Brian Levy caution us that the governance agenda today—encompassing public administration, rule of law, and accountability to citizens—has become “inflated” and “counterproductive.”[2] These scholars question the wisdom of donors and development practitioners who push their governance wish Read more…

Threats to Democracy in Slovakia

Peter Goliaš, Jozef Hajko, and Michal Piško, Introduction In 1989, communist regimes crumbled in Central Europe. To a large extent, it was due to communism’s inability to keep pace with the economic development seen in the democratic world. A standard of living, which was lagging behind, was an important cause of dissatisfaction among people in the region. The process of catching up started with the transition to democracy and market economy. Read more…

Democratic and Economic Development in the Digital Era

Maiko Nakagaki, New opportunities in the interconnected world Read more…

Development Evaluation at a Key Inflection Point

Denise Baer, Is development evaluation at an inflection point in 2017? Jane Reisman and Veronica Olazabel, authors of the newly released Rockefeller Foundation Report Situating the Next Generation of Impact Measurement and Evaluation for Impact Investing, say it is. Read more…

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